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Leftists Speak Out
BECKY JOHNSON ANSWERS BAY GUARDIAN LETTERS AGAINST

 Club Cruz with DAFKA National National Director Lee Kaplan and Scott Kennedy of the Resource Center For NonVIolence will be broadcast on Tuesday, August  19th and again on August 21st on channel 27 at 7PM.  in Santa Cruz.--Becky Johnson

 

 

Response to "Letters from Palestine"

(where ever THAT is!)


Commentary on letters from 6 Palestinian activists printed in the

San Francisco Bay Guardian in the August 6-12 Issue


by Becky Johnson

August 15, 2003

Santa Cruz, Ca. -- I recently attended an event sponsored by the Resource Center for Nonviolence here in Santa Cruz. One of the brochures they were displaying was called "Israel's Apartheid Wall" and showed a formidable concrete wall dotted with armed turrets. The caption beneath the photo stated the wall was 216 miles long, 25 feet tall, and with a 95 - 315 feet buffer zone with electric fences, trenches, cameras, and security patrols. In reality, the concrete part of the "wall" is only one and a half miles long.

Directly below the photo of the wall is a photo of the Berlin Wall. The brochure was published by Global Exchange. Now correct me if I am wrong. But wasn't the Berlin Wall built to keep the East Germans from cutting across the border and moving into West Germany where the living standards were considerably higher and the repression considerably less? For the Israeli wall to be equivalent to the
Berlin Wall, it would have had to have been built to keep the Israelis from jumping ship and moving into the Palestinian areas to live.

Walls are sometimes built to keep things in. This wall is built to keep things out --- a fact never mentioned by any of the authors quoted accept obliquely by letter writer, Michelle Hudson, who said the Israelis "claim" the wall is for their security, as though that were a questionable concept. With hundreds of terrorist acts committed against Israeli civilians and even more caught and thwarted, Israel has every right to be concerned and to take action for their own security. Hudson calls this a "land grab." At 25 feet high, 216 miles long and between 95 and 315 feet wide, the wall/fence takes up about 9 square miles.

"Apartheid" wall is also a questionable analogy. In Apartheid South Africa, black citizens were not allowed in the white areas at night or to vote. But Israel's population is 20% Arab/Israeli with other nationalities represented such as North Africans, Argentinians, Russians. In fact Jews from all different countries of the world are represented, composing a pluralistic society, all with full citizenship rights. The racial issue becomes even more muddied, when any Palestinians (and even some of the international activists cited in the
article) advocate making the entire West Bank and Gaza free of Jews. Israel has NEVER advocated making Israel Islamic free.

I don't support the wall. I think its too expensive, cannot be built on agreed upon borders (since many factions do not agree on where the borders should be placed), and does not even work. A seven-year old girl was recently shot to death while riding in her family's car along one of the most fortified sections of the wall. The Palestinian terrorists had simply tunneled beneath the wall and murdered her. But Israel has more than ample cause to try to stop the attacks from occurring.

I believe only a political solution will end the violence. Unfortunately the six activists quoted in "Letters from Palestine" are never going to bring about a peaceful solution using the tactics they are using. Writer Dara Silverman writes of learning of a recent suicide bomb on a bus in Jerusalem. In the same breath, she reports of an IDF bombing and killing of a Hamas terrorist killing 3 civilians in the process. As though a police officer killing wanted criminal is equivalent to blowing up civilians on a bus. Not one writer mentions Al Aksa Martyrs Brigade, or Islamic Jihad or any of the 12 terrorist groups operating in the Palestinian areas --- none of which are in favor of a Palestinian State side by side Israel.

WHERE IS PALESTINE ANYWAY?

I do not use the name "Palestine" for that is the name used by those who do not recognize Israel's right to exist as a Jewish State. "Palestine" was the name given by the Romans in the first century A.D. after they had burned the Jewish temple to the ground. The name disappeared for centuries only to be resurrected by the British after World War I when the Ottoman Empire lost control of the area. The Jews were called "Palestinians" and the Arabs were called "Arabs".

The authors seem to believe that the Palestinians want to be independant from Israel. Here is a major error made by many of those on the left. The Palestinians do not want a Palestinian state. They rejected it in 1948. They accepted it in 1993 under the Oslo Accords, but the incidences of terror attacks on Israelis went up dramatically, so the whole peace process broke down. They were offered a Palestinian State at Camp David by Barak in 2000. Arafat rejected it and presented no counter-offer. George W. Bush in his "Road Map to Peace" offered the Palestinians a means to achieve their own, independant state. The
number and scope of terror attacks by Palestinian extremists immediately increased. What the authors do not understand is that the people they are supporting by and large want to dismantle Israel, and some even want to exterminate the Jews. The other part they are missing, is the sincere desire of the Israelis to live and let live, to live side by side in peace and prosperity with their Palestinian neighbors.

I do not deny the Palestinian people's quest for a national identity separate from Jordanians, Syrians, Arabians, or Egyptians--- but it does not go back centuries. It goes back to 1968, right after a coalition force of Egyptians, Syrians, Jordanian, Iraqi, and Lebanese muslims had been soundly defeated by Israel in the 1967 war. For up until 1967, the Arab/Muslim nations had felt sure they could wipe the Jewish nation off the map militarily. In 1968 they took a different tack.

Writer, Arla Ertz describes a visit to a Palestinian family whose small son had been killed when his head was blown open. The author does not say who killed the boy. But the implication that the Israelis killed the child hangs on every sentence. Had this boy been killed by a stray, Palestinian bullet, or by an accident as the child played among dangerous weapons or bomb-making parts at some terrorist hide-out, the author would never know. Nor do we. The Israeli Defense Force has a permanent policy to minimize or avoid all together civilian causalties in their maneuvers. Had this boy been one of many who daily go to Israeli checkpoints and guard stations to pelt them with rocks? The author does
not speculate.

Writer Dara Silverman describes an encounter with a group of "singing and yelling marchers" composed of Israeli settlers in East Jerusalem who "streamed around me" and "looked curiously at our group". She then describes how seeing this pro-Israeli group made her "feel like her heart was breaking". She describes their march with songs, slogans, and signs as "colonial tools to hammer their supremacy home" and "a rod to shove down the throat of the neighborhood." Writer Michelle Hudson describes a different march, this time with Palestinians and ISM activists in which they "held signs, banners, and balloons holding the names of Palestinian political prisoners." She says it was "a spirited march with chants, noisemakers, and a lot of energy." Silverman's
march culminated with spray-painting and throwing balloons filled with paint against the wall. So one march is sinister and frightening (but involves no vandalism) while another march leaves everyone with "a good feeling."

No where does any of the six writers acknowledge that the Israeli government is both seiged with armed terrorists who don't "accidently" kill civilians and obligated to protect them. It is a foregone conclusion in the minds of these writers that if the Palestinians achieve "their freedom" and their "independant state" then peace will prevail. Yet where is the evidence that this is likely to happen? If the Palestinians want their national identity and autonomy so badly, why do they scuttle every peace process and are doing so even now?

Do any of the writers address the human rights issues of honor killings of women, public executions by the Palestinian Authority, public lynchings of "Israeli collaborators", or discrimination against gays and lesbians? None of these human rights issues are committed by the Israelis--only by the Palestinians.

Writer Rob Eshelman describes reading in the daily paper, Haaretz, an article focused on a missing Israeli cab driver believed to have been apprehended by Palestinian militants. He describes the topic as "stupid, sensational journalism." So a kidnapping is not even worth reporting?

Eshelman explains that "since Israeli border closures and intense restrictions on Palestinian travel into Israel" the Palestinians have suffered from unemployment and poverty. While the intifada that triggered the IDF security measures was begun by Palestinian militants, it is the Israelis who get all Eshelman's blame. He does not mention those blown to bits by suicide bombers or recovering with months and months of physical therapy from devastating injuries, but then they are Jewish. Or perhaps that would be more "stupid, sensational journalism" which Eshelman already told us he loathes.

The five-page article with cover graphics finally ends with the comments from writer, Michelle Hudson. She hopes for a time when "the people inside Palestine and Israel know that it is possible to live side by side as neighbors and teach their children love and understanding instead of hate and fear." Hudson's delusion is that the only impediment is "the Israeli government doing all it can
to make the lives of the Palestinians unbearable." One wonders if it ever occurred to Hudson that no one ever sees Jewish children throwing rocks at Palestinian policemen and what that says about their parents.

Becky Johnson is a homeless advocate based in Santa Cruz, Ca, and a memeber of the Green Party. She is of Finnish descent and not Jewish.

For more articles about Israel by Becky Johnson, please visit www.dafka.org

 

 

 

 

 

 


 
 
    
     
  
    the Club Cruz with you and Scott Kennedy will be broadcast on Tuesday, August
19th and again on August 21st on channel 27 at 7PM.  --Becky

 

 

Response to "Letters from Palestine"

(where ever THAT is!)


Commentary on letters from 6 Palestinian activists printed in the

San Francisco Bay Guardian in the August 6-12 Issue


by Becky Johnson

August 15, 2003

Santa Cruz, Ca. -- I recently attended an event sponsored by the Resource Center
for Nonviolence here in Santa Cruz. One of the brochures they were displaying
was called "Israel's Apartheid Wall" and showed a formidable concrete wall
dotted with armed turrets. The caption beneath the photo stated the wall was 216
miles long, 25 feet tall, and with a 95 - 315 feet buffer zone with electric
fences, trenches, cameras, and security patrols. In reality, the concrete part
of the "wall" is only one and a half miles long.

Directly below the photo of the wall is a photo of the Berlin Wall. The brochure
was published by Global Exchange. Now correct me if I am wrong. But wasn't the
Berlin Wall built to keep the East Germans from cutting across the border and
moving into West Germany where the living standards were considerably higher and
the repression considerably less? For the Israeli wall to be equivalent to the
Berlin Wall, it would have had to have been built to keep the Israelis from
jumping ship and moving into the Palestinian areas to live.

Walls are sometimes built to keep things in. This wall is built to keep things
out --- a fact never mentioned by any of the authors quoted accept obliquely by
letter writer, Michelle Hudson, who said the Israelis "claim" the wall is for
their security, as though that were a questionable concept. With hundreds of
terrorist acts committed against Israeli civilians and even more caught and
thwarted, Israel has every right to be concerned and to take action for their
own security. Hudson calls this a "land grab." At 25 feet high, 216 miles long
and between 95 and 315 feet wide, the wall/fence takes up about 9 square miles.

"Apartheid" wall is also a questionable analogy. In Apartheid South Africa,
black citizens were not allowed in the white areas at night or to vote. But
Israel's population is 20% Arab/Israeli with other nationalities represented
such as North Africans, Argentinians, Russians. In fact Jews from all different
countries of the world are represented, composing a pluralistic society, all
with full citizenship rights. The racial issue becomes even more muddied, when
many Palestinians (and even some of the international activists cited in the
article) advocate making the entire West Bank and Gaza free of Jews. Israel has
NEVER advocated making Israel Islamic free.

I don't support the wall. I think its too expensive, cannot be built on agreed
upon borders (since many factions do not agree on where the borders should be
placed), and does not even work. A seven-year old girl was recently shot to
death while riding in her family's car along one of the most fortified sections
of the wall. The Palestinian terrorists had simply tunneled beneath the wall and
murdered her. But Israel has more than ample cause to try to stop the attacks
from occurring.

I believe only a political solution will end the violence. Unfortunately the six
activists quoted in "Letters from Palestine" are never going to bring about a
peaceful solution using the tactics they are using. Writer Dara Silverman writes
of learning of a recent suicide bomb on a bus in Jerusalem. In the same breath,
she reports of an IDF bombing and killing of a Hamas terrorist killing 3
civilians in the process. As though a police officer killing wanted criminal is
equivalent to blowing up civilians on a bus. Not one writer mentions Al Aksa
Martyrs Brigade, or Islamic Jihad or any of the 12 terrorist groups operating in
the Palestinian areas --- none of which are in favor of a Palestinian State side
by side Israel.

WHERE IS PALESTINE ANYWAY?

I do not use the name "Palestine" for that is the name used by those who do not
recognize Israel's right to exist as a Jewish State. "Palestine" was the name
given by the Romans in the first century A.D. after they had burned the Jewish
temple to the ground. The name disappeared for centuries only to be resurrected
by the British after World War I when the Ottoman Empire lost control of the
area. The Jews were called "Palestinians" and the Arabs were called "Arabs".

The authors seem to believe that the Palestinians want to be independant from
Israel. Here is a major error made by many of those on the left. The
Palestinians do not want a Palestinian state. They rejected it in 1948. They
accepted it in 1993 under the Oslo Accords, but the incidences of terror attacks
on Israelis went up dramatically, so the whole peace process broke down. They
were offered a Palestinian State at Camp David by Barak in 2000. Arafat rejected
it and presented no counter-offer. George W. Bush in his "Road Map to Peace"
offered the Palestinians a means to achieve their own, independant state. The
number and scope of terror attacks by Palestinian extremists immediately
increased. What the authors do not understand is that the people they are
supporting by and large want to dismantle Israel, and some even want to
exterminate the Jews. The other part they are missing, is the sincere desire of
the Israelis to live and let live, to live side by side in peace and prosperity
with their Palestinian neighbors.

I do not deny the Palestinian people's quest for a national identity separate
from Jordanians, Syrians, Arabians, or Egyptians--- but it does not go back
centuries. It goes back to 1968, right after a coalition force of Egyptians,
Syrians, Jordanian, Iraqi, and Lebanese muslims had been soundly defeated by
Israel in the 1967 war. For up until 1967, the Arab/Muslim nations had felt sure
they could wipe the Jewish nation off the map militarily. In 1968 they took a
different tact.

Writer, Arla Ertz describes a visit to a Palestinian family whose small son had
been killed when his head was blown open. The author does not say who killed the
boy. But the implication that the Israelis killed the child hangs on every
sentence. Had this boy been killed by a stray, Palestinian bullet, or by an
accident as the child played among dangerous weapons or bomb-making parts at
some terrorist hide-out, the author would never know. Nor do we. The Israeli
Defense Force has a permanent policy to minimize or avoid all together civilian
causalties in their maneuvers. Had this boy been one of many who daily go to
Israeli checkpoints and guard stations to pelt them with rocks? The author does
not speculate.

Writer Dara Silverman describes an encounter with a group of "singing and
yelling marchers" composed of Israeli settlers in East Jerusalem who "streamed
around me" and "looked curiously at our group". She then describes how seeing
this pro-Israeli group made her "feel like her heart was breaking". She
describes their march with songs, slogans, and signs as "colonial tools to
hammer their supremacy home" and "a rod to shove down the throat of the
neighborhood." Writer Michelle Hudson describes a different march, this time
with Palestinians and ISM activists in which they "held signs, banners, and
balloons holding the names of Palestinian political prisoners." She says it was
"a spirited march with chants, noisemakers, and a lot of energy." Silverman's
march culminated with spray-painting and throwing balloons filled with paint
against the wall. So one march is sinister and frightening (but involves no
vandalism) while another march leaves everyone with "a good feeling."

No where does any of the six writers acknowledge that the Israeli government is
both seiged with armed terrorists who don't "accidently" kill civilians and
obligated to protect them. It is a foregone conclusion in the minds of these
writers that if the Palestinians achieve "their freedom" and their "independant
state" then peace will prevail. Yet where is the evidence that this is likely to
happen? If the Palestinians want their national identity and autonomy so badly,
why do they scuttle every peace process and are doing so even now?

Do any of the writers address the human rights issues of honor killings of
women, public executions by the Palestinian Authority, public lynchings of
"Israeli collaborators", or discrimination against gays and lesbians? None of
these human rights issues are committed by the Israelis--only by the
Palestinians.

Writer Rob Eshelman describes reading in the daily paper, Haaretz, an article
focused on a missing Israeli cab driver believed to have been apprehended by
Palestinian militants. He describes the topic as "stupid, sensational
journalism." So a kidnapping is not even worth reporting?

Eshelman explains that "since Israeli border closures and intense restrictions
on Palestinian travel into Israel" the Palestinians have suffered from
unemployment and poverty. While the intifada that triggered the IDF security
measures was begun by Palestinian militants, it is the Israelis who get all
Eshelman's blame. He does not mention those blown to bits by suicide bombers or
recovering with months and months of physical therapy from devastating injuries,
but then they are Jewish. Or perhaps that would be more "stupid, sensational
journalism" which Eshelman already told us he loathes.

The five-page article with cover graphics finally ends with the comments from
writer, Michelle Hudson. She hopes for a time when "the people inside Palestine
and Israel know that it is possible to live side by side as neighbors and teach
their children love and understanding instead of hate and fear." Hudson's
delusion is that the only impediment is "the Israeli government doing all it can
to make the lives of the Palestinians unbearable." One wonders if it ever
occurred to Hudson that no one ever sees Jewish children throwing rocks at
Palestinian policemen and what that says about their parents.

Becky JOhnson is a homeless advocate based in Santa Cruz, Ca, and a memeber of the Green Party.
She is of Finnish descent and not Jewish.

For more articles about Israel by Becky Johnson, please visit www.dafka.org

 

 

 

 

 

 


 
 
    
     
  
    the Club Cruz with you and Scott Kennedy will be broadcast on Tuesday, August
19th and again on August 21st on channel 27 at 7PM.  --Becky

 

 

Response to "Letters from Palestine"

(where ever THAT is!)


Commentary on letters from 6 Palestinian activists printed in the

San Francisco Bay Guardian in the August 6-12 Issue


by Becky Johnson

August 15, 2003

Santa Cruz, Ca. -- I recently attended an event sponsored by the Resource Center
for Nonviolence here in Santa Cruz. One of the brochures they were displaying
was called "Israel's Apartheid Wall" and showed a formidable concrete wall
dotted with armed turrets. The caption beneath the photo stated the wall was 216
miles long, 25 feet tall, and with a 95 - 315 feet buffer zone with electric
fences, trenches, cameras, and security patrols. In reality, the concrete part
of the "wall" is only one and a half miles long.

Directly below the photo of the wall is a photo of the Berlin Wall. The brochure
was published by Global Exchange. Now correct me if I am wrong. But wasn't the
Berlin Wall built to keep the East Germans from cutting across the border and
moving into West Germany where the living standards were considerably higher and
the repression considerably less? For the Israeli wall to be equivalent to the
Berlin Wall, it would have had to have been built to keep the Israelis from
jumping ship and moving into the Palestinian areas to live.

Walls are sometimes built to keep things in. This wall is built to keep things
out --- a fact never mentioned by any of the authors quoted accept obliquely by
letter writer, Michelle Hudson, who said the Israelis "claim" the wall is for
their security, as though that were a questionable concept. With hundreds of
terrorist acts committed against Israeli civilians and even more caught and
thwarted, Israel has every right to be concerned and to take action for their
own security. Hudson calls this a "land grab." At 25 feet high, 216 miles long
and between 95 and 315 feet wide, the wall/fence takes up about 9 square miles.

"Apartheid" wall is also a questionable analogy. In Apartheid South Africa,
black citizens were not allowed in the white areas at night or to vote. But
Israel's population is 20% Arab/Israeli with other nationalities represented
such as North Africans, Argentinians, Russians. In fact Jews from all different
countries of the world are represented, composing a pluralistic society, all
with full citizenship rights. The racial issue becomes even more muddied, when
many Palestinians (and even some of the international activists cited in the
article) advocate making the entire West Bank and Gaza free of Jews. Israel has
NEVER advocated making Israel Islamic free.

I don't support the wall. I think its too expensive, cannot be built on agreed
upon borders (since many factions do not agree on where the borders should be
placed), and does not even work. A seven-year old girl was recently shot to
death while riding in her family's car along one of the most fortified sections
of the wall. The Palestinian terrorists had simply tunneled beneath the wall and
murdered her. But Israel has more than ample cause to try to stop the attacks
from occurring.

I believe only a political solution will end the violence. Unfortunately the six
activists quoted in "Letters from Palestine" are never going to bring about a
peaceful solution using the tactics they are using. Writer Dara Silverman writes
of learning of a recent suicide bomb on a bus in Jerusalem. In the same breath,
she reports of an IDF bombing and killing of a Hamas terrorist killing 3
civilians in the process. As though a police officer killing wanted criminal is
equivalent to blowing up civilians on a bus. Not one writer mentions Al Aksa
Martyrs Brigade, or Islamic Jihad or any of the 12 terrorist groups operating in
the Palestinian areas --- none of which are in favor of a Palestinian State side
by side Israel.

WHERE IS PALESTINE ANYWAY?

I do not use the name "Palestine" for that is the name used by those who do not
recognize Israel's right to exist as a Jewish State. "Palestine" was the name
given by the Romans in the first century A.D. after they had burned the Jewish
temple to the ground. The name disappeared for centuries only to be resurrected
by the British after World War I when the Ottoman Empire lost control of the
area. The Jews were called "Palestinians" and the Arabs were called "Arabs".

The authors seem to believe that the Palestinians want to be independant from
Israel. Here is a major error made by many of those on the left. The
Palestinians do not want a Palestinian state. They rejected it in 1948. They
accepted it in 1993 under the Oslo Accords, but the incidences of terror attacks
on Israelis went up dramatically, so the whole peace process broke down. They
were offered a Palestinian State at Camp David by Barak in 2000. Arafat rejected
it and presented no counter-offer. George W. Bush in his "Road Map to Peace"
offered the Palestinians a means to achieve their own, independant state. The
number and scope of terror attacks by Palestinian extremists immediately
increased. What the authors do not understand is that the people they are
supporting by and large want to dismantle Israel, and some even want to
exterminate the Jews. The other part they are missing, is the sincere desire of
the Israelis to live and let live, to live side by side in peace and prosperity
with their Palestinian neighbors.

I do not deny the Palestinian people's quest for a national identity separate
from Jordanians, Syrians, Arabians, or Egyptians--- but it does not go back
centuries. It goes back to 1968, right after a coalition force of Egyptians,
Syrians, Jordanian, Iraqi, and Lebanese muslims had been soundly defeated by
Israel in the 1967 war. For up until 1967, the Arab/Muslim nations had felt sure
they could wipe the Jewish nation off the map militarily. In 1968 they took a
different tact.

Writer, Arla Ertz describes a visit to a Palestinian family whose small son had
been killed when his head was blown open. The author does not say who killed the
boy. But the implication that the Israelis killed the child hangs on every
sentence. Had this boy been killed by a stray, Palestinian bullet, or by an
accident as the child played among dangerous weapons or bomb-making parts at
some terrorist hide-out, the author would never know. Nor do we. The Israeli
Defense Force has a permanent policy to minimize or avoid all together civilian
causalties in their maneuvers. Had this boy been one of many who daily go to
Israeli checkpoints and guard stations to pelt them with rocks? The author does
not speculate.

Writer Dara Silverman describes an encounter with a group of "singing and
yelling marchers" composed of Israeli settlers in East Jerusalem who "streamed
around me" and "looked curiously at our group". She then describes how seeing
this pro-Israeli group made her "feel like her heart was breaking". She
describes their march with songs, slogans, and signs as "colonial tools to
hammer their supremacy home" and "a rod to shove down the throat of the
neighborhood." Writer Michelle Hudson describes a different march, this time
with Palestinians and ISM activists in which they "held signs, banners, and
balloons holding the names of Palestinian political prisoners." She says it was
"a spirited march with chants, noisemakers, and a lot of energy." Silverman's
march culminated with spray-painting and throwing balloons filled with paint
against the wall. So one march is sinister and frightening (but involves no
vandalism) while another march leaves everyone with "a good feeling."

No where does any of the six writers acknowledge that the Israeli government is
both seiged with armed terrorists who don't "accidently" kill civilians and
obligated to protect them. It is a foregone conclusion in the minds of these
writers that if the Palestinians achieve "their freedom" and their "independant
state" then peace will prevail. Yet where is the evidence that this is likely to
happen? If the Palestinians want their national identity and autonomy so badly,
why do they scuttle every peace process and are doing so even now?

Do any of the writers address the human rights issues of honor killings of
women, public executions by the Palestinian Authority, public lynchings of
"Israeli collaborators", or discrimination against gays and lesbians? None of
these human rights issues are committed by the Israelis--only by the
Palestinians.

Writer Rob Eshelman describes reading in the daily paper, Haaretz, an article
focused on a missing Israeli cab driver believed to have been apprehended by
Palestinian militants. He describes the topic as "stupid, sensational
journalism." So a kidnapping is not even worth reporting?

Eshelman explains that "since Israeli border closures and intense restrictions
on Palestinian travel into Israel" the Palestinians have suffered from
unemployment and poverty. While the intifada that triggered the IDF security
measures was begun by Palestinian militants, it is the Israelis who get all
Eshelman's blame. He does not mention those blown to bits by suicide bombers or
recovering with months and months of physical therapy from devastating injuries,
but then they are Jewish. Or perhaps that would be more "stupid, sensational
journalism" which Eshelman already told us he loathes.

The five-page article with cover graphics finally ends with the comments from
writer, Michelle Hudson. She hopes for a time when "the people inside Palestine
and Israel know that it is possible to live side by side as neighbors and teach
their children love and understanding instead of hate and fear." Hudson's
delusion is that the only impediment is "the Israeli government doing all it can
to make the lives of the Palestinians unbearable." One wonders if it ever
occurred to Hudson that no one ever sees Jewish children throwing rocks at
Palestinian policemen and what that says about their parents.

Becky JOhnson is a homeless advocate based in Santa Cruz, Ca, and a memeber of the Green Party.
She is of Finnish descent and not Jewish.

For more articles about Israel by Becky Johnson, please visit www.dafka.org